Singapore Girl Slut-Shamed After Giving Molester a Verbal Smackdown

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She bravely stands up against her molester but gets blamed for her clothing. What is wrong with people?!

Calling out a victim for her "indecent" clothes is slut shaming. And we might not even realise it, but slut shaming is sexual harassment. 

Picture this: you're just minding your own business when a stranger forcefully touches or gropes you all of a sudden. How would you react?

Sadly, Louise Lee of Singapore didn't have to visualise how she would respond if faced with such a traumatic situation because it actually happened to her.

Girl Gets Molested In Public And Then Shamed For Her Clothes 

Reports say Louise Lee, 23, was travelling by bus on the morning of May 20, 2018, Sunday along Telok Blangah Road when a 51-year-old man groped her. 

The feisty gal fought back and called him out! She yelled at him and threatened to call the police. 

Because she was making a ruckus, the bus driver noticed what was happening and detained the man on the bus until he was arrested. The perpetrator even attempted to flee!

The man begged Louise not to report him as he had prior molestation cases. But she adamantly—and rightfully—did not back down. The man then proceeded to threaten her, so the bus driver kindly advised her to get off the bus to safety. 

Louise shared her nightmarish experience on a Facebook post, where she also took time to thank the bus driver and commuters for rallying together to protect her, even though they didn't know who she was. See a screenshot of her post below: 

src=https://sg admin.herstyleasia.com/wp content/uploads/sites/26/2018/05/woman molested on bus 3 1 1.jpg Singapore Girl Slut Shamed After Giving Molester a Verbal Smackdown

Commuters Rallied Behind Her But She Didn't Get Much Support Online

Louise's post, which was shared over 600 times in just a few days, has since been taken down—because sadly, not everyone was as supportive when she posted about the incident online. 

Some asked what she was wearing at the time, while others bashed her because her clothes were "too short." One commenter even harassed her, further saying that the man should have tried being her boyfriend first so he would get the license to harass her. Another mocked her for looking like a maid.

The Importance of Speaking Out...Online and Offline

Whether you're wearing tight, short clothing or  are "covered up" when harassed, it really doesn't matter. Victim-blaming is never okay. Under no circumstances is harassment the victim's fault. 

Louise is not the only one. Every woman has their own #MeToo experience. And it's something we shouldn't keep mum about. We need to maintain this momentum of holding perpetrators accountable. 

Back in university, I experienced something similar on my commute as well. I was wearing my school uniform (not that it matters), when an older man groped me. He pretended like it was an accident, but I knew that it wasn't. As a woman, you just know. 

I felt violated and frightened, but mostly angry. This wasn't the first time it happened to me. So, I yelled at him and made sure everybody heard it.

When I confronted him, he downplayed the situation, pretending like he had no idea what happened. As if I was simply overreacting—even security told me to "stop making a scene."

But making a scene is precisely what we should do, ladies! As they say, time's up!

Time's up for these perverts who think they can get away with molesting unsuspecting girls and women. Contrary to what they think, we are not defenceless creatures. We have a voice (and a strong pair of fists, if needed). 

Sources: AsiaOne, TIME, Anti-Violence Project, Very Well Family, The Huffington Post

(Feature & lead image courtesy: Pexels)